European Youth Parliament UK 2016-11-20T18:04:15Z http://www.eypuk.co.uk/feed/atom/ Toni Kerridge <![CDATA[New Blog Launch! Representing the views of young people at Brexit!]]> http://www.eypuk.co.uk/?p=4394 2016-10-17T12:26:11Z 2016-10-17T12:26:11Z Following the result of the June 2016 referendum on British membership of the European Union, the European Youth Parliament UK (EYPUK) is launching a campaign to represent the views of its members and of other young people. It is the aim of EYPUK to eventually publish a report detailing the wants, desires, and demands of […]

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Following the result of the June 2016 referendum on British membership of the European Union, the European Youth Parliament UK (EYPUK) is launching a campaign to represent the views of its members and of other young people.

It is the aim of EYPUK to eventually publish a report detailing the wants, desires, and demands of young people in relation to Great Britain’s new European settlement. The report will include a number of articles written by our members arguing for the issues they feel are most important to young people. It will also include a number of articles written by academics and politicians stressing the importance of representing the views of young people in these negotiations, and the effects Brexit will have on young people. It is our aim that this report, once completed, will be widely publicised and available for download from a number of sources. We also hope to have this report delivered to those involved in the negotiation discussions.

Therefore, we are looking for young people to write a number of well-researched articles, arguing for the specific issues affecting young people that they feel need most consideration at the discussion table. In other words, we want to know how you want the Brexit deal to look. What are your demands as young people? What assurances for young people do you want to be included in the final deal?

Submissions will be published on our widely-read blog for other young people to see. Once enough articles have been published, we will ask our roster of over 800 European Youth Parliament UK members to vote on the articles they feel were most persuasive. The articles with the most votes will be compiled into the final report.

As a hub for debate and freedom of speech, your posts do not need to be impartial and we will be accepting posts from across the political spectrum, although we do ask that you don’t write anything that could be considered ‘extreme’.

To contribute to our campaign, have your work published on our blog, and be in with a chance of having your article featured in the final report, please send your article submissions to robert.wragg@eypuk.co.uk along with a picture of yourself and a short one paragraph bio.

Articles should be 600-1000 words long, although please feel free to write more if you have more to contribute.

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Toni Kerridge <![CDATA[CALL FOR BELFAST EURVOICE — CHAIRS AND JOURNALISTS!]]> http://www.eypuk.co.uk/?p=4384 2016-10-12T21:29:48Z 2016-10-12T21:29:48Z We are delighted to share the call for chairs and journalists to attend Belfast’s upcoming EurVoice session. The event will take place at Belfast City Hall on 22nd November from 11:30 to 16:00. The day will be opened with an address from the Lord Mayor of Belfast followed by workshops with groups of schoolchildren, and […]

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We are delighted to share the call for chairs and journalists to attend Belfast’s upcoming EurVoice session.

The event will take place at Belfast City Hall on 22nd November from 11:30 to 16:00. The day will be opened with an address from the Lord Mayor of Belfast followed by workshops with groups of schoolchildren, and a Q&A session with local councillors.

This is the perfect opportunity for those in Belfast who are are new to EYP, and are looking for a nice introductory session to kick off their EYP careers, to get involved with EYP, as well as a great opportunity for all other EYPers who live in Belfast to get some more experience!

For any information or to apply e-mail lucy.fowler@eypuk.co.uk or ali.amjad@eypuk.co.uk

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Toni Kerridge <![CDATA[Call for National Session Head Organisers 2017!]]> http://www.eypuk.co.uk/?p=4379 2016-10-12T21:16:59Z 2016-10-02T18:38:00Z EYPUK are delighted to announce the call for Head Organisers for their National Sessions 2017! All the information is in the Call for National Session Head Organisers and the Application Form can be found here. Being a Head Organiser of an EYPUK National Session is a fantastic way to build on your EYP experience, as well as developing […]

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EYPUK are delighted to announce the call for Head Organisers for their National Sessions 2017!
All the information is in the Call for National Session Head Organisers and the Application Form can be found here.

Being a Head Organiser of an EYPUK National Session is a fantastic way to build on your EYP experience, as well as developing key skills along the way, such as organisation and time management. It’s also a very rewarding experience which allows you to bring new and innovative ideas to the table and really get involved in EYPUK! 

If you have any questions then please get in touch: alexandra.thompson@eypuk.co.uk

The deadline for applications is 16th October by 23:59 GMT.

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Toni Kerridge <![CDATA[Call for Regional Head Organisers 2017!]]> http://www.eypuk.co.uk/?p=4370 2016-10-12T21:22:56Z 2016-09-16T18:53:36Z The European Youth Parliament UK is delighted to open the call for Head Organisers for their 2017 Regional Sessions! This role is a perfect opportunity to bring EYP to over 100 new delegates, whilst developing your own organisational skills and EYP experience so we would encourage everyone to apply, be this your first session as […]

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The European Youth Parliament UK is delighted to open the call for Head Organisers for their 2017 Regional Sessions!

This role is a perfect opportunity to bring EYP to over 100 new delegates, whilst developing your own organisational skills and EYP experience so we would encourage everyone to apply, be this your first session as an official or your twentieth! Any questions, feel free to contact us at: regionals@eypuk.co.uk.

The application form is available here.

Deadline for applications will be midnight on the 29th September.

We look forward to reading your applications!

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Toni Kerridge <![CDATA[EurVoice Liverpool: Call for Officials]]> http://www.eypuk.co.uk/?p=4356 2016-08-08T18:52:00Z 2016-08-08T15:47:40Z We are very excited to announce our Call for Officials for our Liverpool EurVoice on the Wednesday 28th September will take place at Liverpool Town Hall. Alumni will be needed from 11:30am. Please email ali.amjad@eypuk.co.uk if you are interested in taking part. This is a fantastic opportunity to get involved in EurVoice, the role on the day will […]

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We are very excited to announce our Call for Officials for our Liverpool EurVoice on the Wednesday 28th September will take place at Liverpool Town Hall. Alumni will be needed from 11:30am. Please email ali.amjad@eypuk.co.uk if you are interested in taking part.

This is a fantastic opportunity to get involved in EurVoice, the role on the day will consist of leading workshops with groups of school children to prepare them for a Q&A session with a panel of experts. To learn more about EYPUK’s EurVoice outreach programme, click here.

eurvoicebelfast

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Toni Kerridge <![CDATA[EYPUK Alumni Executive Elections Results 2016!]]> http://www.eypuk.co.uk/?p=4346 2016-07-11T17:06:36Z 2016-07-04T20:35:50Z With our very successful Summer National Session 2016 now finished, it is my pleasure to announce the results of the Alumni Executive Elections 2016. The full breakdown of the results is available below: President: Peter McManus – 49 RON- 13 Alumni Development Officer: Morgan Barnden – 27 Bethany Appleton – 38 RON – 3 Regional Forum […]

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With our very successful Summer National Session 2016 now finished, it is my pleasure to announce the results of the Alumni Executive Elections 2016.

The full breakdown of the results is available below:

President:

Peter McManus – 49

RON- 13

Alumni Development Officer:

Morgan Barnden – 27

Bethany Appleton – 38

RON – 3

Regional Forum Coordinators:

Emily Long – 54

Annie MacConnachie – 48

RON – 7

EurVoice Coordinators:

Lucy Fowler – 33

Joseph Reed – 15

Millie Smith – 23

RON – 4

Communications Coordinators:

Jago Lynch- 39

Beth McDade – 10

Kaya Safa – 20

Natalie Tsang – 31

Nia Williams – 20

RON – 4

I would like to wish many congratulations to the new team consisting of Peter, Bethany, Emily, Annie, Lucy, Jago and Natalie. I am really excited to see all your manifestos come to life this year!

I would like to thank all candidates who stood in the election, it was a very exciting period, and I hope that you will all remain involved in EYPUK throughout the next year.

The next two months will be a handover period from the old to the new Alumni Executive and I am very much looking forward to see the new team in place in September!

Alexandra Entwistle – Thompson

President of the Alumni Executive 2015-2016

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Toni Kerridge <![CDATA[EYPUK Statement on the EU Referendum]]> http://www.eypuk.co.uk/?p=4335 2016-06-25T13:23:08Z 2016-06-25T13:23:08Z The European Youth Parliament UK (EYPUK) has existed for over 20 years. We have engaged and empowered thousands of young people from all corners of the United Kingdom to develop a deeper understanding between European nations through education, collaboration and respect. Though we are an apolitical charity, the vote to leave the EU undoubtedly represents […]

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The European Youth Parliament UK (EYPUK) has existed for over 20 years. We have engaged and empowered thousands of young people from all corners of the United Kingdom to develop a deeper understanding between European nations through education, collaboration and respect.

Though we are an apolitical charity, the vote to leave the EU undoubtedly represents a significant challenge for EYPUK. Our existence is, however, not dependent on the UK’s membership. EYPUK will remain and we will continue tirelessly to engage and educate young people on European and EU issues. The referendum result makes our work as important as ever.

The challenge we now face must be seen as an opportunity. An opportunity to develop and grow as an organisation, and to promote our message even further: a message of understanding, respect, cultural dialogue and education.

With 75% of 18-25 year olds voting ‘Remain’ and with 16-17 year olds excluded from the referendum, there are now many questions about whether the youth of this country are being heard. EYPUK’s primary aim is give young people a voice; we want to let the youth of Britain know now – when there are feelings that this result does not represent them – that we will continue to work to make sure their voices are being heard.

We know the value and importance of young people’s voices and how they can be excluded from the political process. Young people in the United Kingdom are given so few platforms to express their views. We are incredibly proud that EYPUK provides such a platform and remain committed to this.

We have been delighted to hear from many of our friends across Europe offering messages of support at a time when these relationships could have been strained.

We understand that change is frightening and unsettling. However, if the work we have done over the past 20 years has taught us anything it is that we are not alone. Together we are stronger. We will continue to give young people a real say in shaping the future: the future of our country and our Europe.

We would love to hear your thoughts on the referendum result. Whether you are happy with the result, or if you are worried about the future, stay in contact with us.

We need your support now more than ever to continue our vital work.

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Toni Kerridge <![CDATA[The European parliament and ‘healthy’ Euroscepticism]]> http://www.eypuk.co.uk/?p=4318 2016-09-28T15:16:03Z 2016-06-21T12:25:14Z “Brussels” has become a synonym for the EU – and all its undemocratic excesses – among many right-wing tabloid newspapers. The EU, we are told, dictates the curve of a banana, or allows convicted terrorists to remain in the UK because an overzealous judge ruled that the ‘right to a family life’ applies to a […]

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“Brussels” has become a synonym for the EU – and all its undemocratic excesses – among many right-wing tabloid newspapers. The EU, we are told, dictates the curve of a banana, or allows convicted terrorists to remain in the UK because an overzealous judge ruled that the ‘right to a family life’ applies to a pet cat. With the upcoming EU referendum, I was eager to see inside this organisation: while I am certainly no Europhile, I believe that the UK is stronger inside the EU. For an investigation into Belgian politics, this seemed the perfect place to start. So, on a cold Monday morning, I walked out of the centre of Brussels, past the palatial majesty of Brussels Park, and watched as the ubiquitous frites and guafre stands gave way to wine bars and fish restaurants, perfect for a working lunch. The European parliament lay ahead of me, a plate-glass-and-steel monolith, towering over the (appropriately named) ‘gare de Luxembourg’.

Were it not for the armed police (cradling FN-FNC fully-automatic rifles and dressed in military fatigues), and lofty quotes about European integration carved into the walls of the plaza, the parliament could have easily been mistaken for the headquarters of a large bank. I walked through the sleet to the visitor centre, passing underneath a digital billboard showing smiling teenagers excited to be learning about European-Federalism, through security, and into the ‘parlimentarium’.

Immediately, the sleeping Eurosceptic in me was awakened. The entrance hall was lined with lofty quotes (“national sovereignty is the root cause of the most crying evils of our time…the only final remedy…is a federal union of the peoples”). On an academic level, I agreed. On a personal level, I was confused: did Farage have a point?

Interactive displays plotted the growth of the EU: first north to the UK, then South, and finally to the east. Statistics (mostly relating to agricultural output and GDP growth) reminded me of soviet economic boasts in Pravda. Video messages from MEPs (including a certain Mr. Farage) played on a loop. Interactive maps showed EU funded projects – a scheme in South Wales, in which employers were urged to cut hours, rather than jobs, left me feeling particularly cold. I have strong family and personal ties to the region.

The museum was a monument to pan-European neo-liberalism. In other words, it represented everything I was against. Was I becoming a Eurosceptic?

I bought an overpriced coffee and headed across the street to the parliament itself. I passed through the scanners. I entered the public gallery. The parliament itself looked exactly as it looked on TV. I thought the same when I entered the House of Commons. The chamber itself was arranged as a hemisphere. Students, taking part in a model EU summit milled around below. The faux-wood and off white walls reminded me more of a lecture theatre than a legislative chamber. Surrounding the room were the translators offices, where teams of linguists worked to simultaneously translate speeches into the 24 official languages of the European Union.

I left the building feeling confused. Nothing I had seen sat comfortably with me: was I now to return to the UK and campaign to leave the EU? I exited the building, turned a corner, and was confronted with an 8 foot high (sorry Eurocrats) concrete monolith, covered with graffiti. Without looking at the plaque I knew almost instinctively what it was.

A section of the Berlin wall. Then another thought hit me: my new-found scepticism was in fact a good thing. The citizens of communist east Europe and Nazi Germany were denied what I was currently feeling: healthy scepticism. The cornerstone of democracy. I am sceptical of lots of things: the UK government, global capitalism, even the management of my own university – and it is that scepticism that allows for change. Democracy, politics even, is built on a foundation of sceptical thought. My research project was itself looking at sceptical attitudes to the Belgian political system – suddenly, being a sceptic felt alright when confronted with such a tangible artefact of the effect of suppression of free thought.

I realised then that I did not want the UK to leave the EU, just as I don’t wish to withdraw from university, or plot the dissolution of the UK parliament. Sure, the visitor centre emphasised a politics with which I don’t agree – pan-European neo-liberalism – but surely then the solution is to campaign for change. It was the politics of the EU, not the institution itself which caused me discomfort. I trudged back through the sleet to the hotel, and resolved – for the first time – to use my vote in the 2019 European elections. Of course, by then, it may well be too late.

 

Liam Smyth 

 

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Toni Kerridge <![CDATA[The Debate on Brexit Urgently Needs a More Global Perspective]]> http://www.eypuk.co.uk/?p=4314 2016-09-27T20:42:08Z 2016-06-21T12:12:25Z Media discourse on whether the UK should leave the European Union has focused on the advantages and disadvantages for Britain. There has been a – somewhat unsurprising – bias, centering discussion upon domestic dynamics and factors here at home.  From unemployment to regulation, we see both the Eurosceptic and pro-Europe camps grappling with the facts […]

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Media discourse on whether the UK should leave the European Union has focused on the advantages and disadvantages for Britain. There has been a – somewhat unsurprising – bias, centering discussion upon domestic dynamics and factors here at home.  From unemployment to regulation, we see both the Eurosceptic and pro-Europe camps grappling with the facts and figures to provide tangible evidence of the way in which leaving the EU would directly affect the UK specifically.

Yet in the context of international capital flows and globalisation, this is problematic.  There are always two sides to every coin, and worryingly little attention has been given to the impact of Brexit on the European Union and the wider global community. The question that needs to start being asked is: what would Europe look like without the UK? An economically weaker and more fragmented Europe would directly hurt the UK.  This angle has hitherto been absent from discussion in the media.  Yet it represents a critical facet of the debate.

In particular, Brexit is likely to bring about further referenda on the EU. In financial markets, Frexit (France), Nexit (The Netherlands), and Catalexit (Catalonia) are already being talked about.  Therein lies the real problem for Britain: that Brexit leads to other countries leaving and thus a gradual unraveling of the entire European project.  Whatever your opinion on what the EU does for Britain, the wider economic benefits of regional liberalisation are only possible through the EU’s existence.

A fundamental underpinning of the entire Out Campaign is the idea that Britain has the strength to thrive on its own.  Even putting aside the counterarguments, it seems to me that such logic is weakened if it can be shown that an EU without us will suffer.  In simple economic wealth terms, if the sum of the parts is greater than the individual components, as morally responsible global citizens this undermines the basic eurosceptic logic.

Even with the potential greater power to decide our own economic policies, Britain is still massively exposed to weakness in the rest of the world, especially Europe.  If our departure hurts the EU, we will feel it.  2016 is proving to be an extremely uncertain year for the global economy.  Developed countries’ central bankers are desperately trying to stimulate growth, in some cases with the use of negative interest rates.  Emerging markets are significantly weaker than anyone expected, with the debt they were able to take on through QE looking like it could turn bad.  There is even talk that banks are more fragile than the regulators had us think, risking a 2008 style crisis.

In this context, the world needs as much unified policymaking as it can get.  Britain’s independence would not make us any less vulnerable – in fact, quite the contrary.  Policies that we would influence in the EU would have far more clout than anything tabled here.  In a globalised economy this is important for Britain.  A fact confirmed, in my opinion, by the absence of any reputable economists in the Out Campaign.

 

Catherine Macaulay

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Toni Kerridge <![CDATA[My plaice or yours: what would Brexit really mean for the UK’s fishing industry?]]> http://www.eypuk.co.uk/?p=4310 2016-09-28T14:49:06Z 2016-06-20T12:50:50Z Fish is as tasty and popular as ever, but no one seems to like the policies that regulate the industry behind it. For decades, European management of fisheries has been lambasted by fishers, conservationists and scientists, including us. The centrepiece of this system, the EU’s Common Fisheries Policy, is particularly unpopular. Some scientists even argue […]

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Fish is as tasty and popular as ever, but no one seems to like the policies that regulate the industry behind it. For decades, European management of fisheries has been lambasted by fishers, conservationists and scientists, including us.

The centrepiece of this system, the EU’s Common Fisheries Policy, is particularly unpopular. Some scientists even argue it is designed to fail. Opponents blame it for not only mismanaging Europe’s highly productive seas, but also for giving away “our fish”, with the subject recently taking centre stage in an unlikely viral Brexit campaign video.

You might think that the chance to take back control of the fish in UK seas would be one of the most solid reasons to vote “Out” in June’s referendum on EU membership. So what’s the catch?

First, the idea that fish in British waters have been fished into near-extinction by pesky foreign boats simply doesn’t match up with reality. At least not anymore.

Yes, fish numbers aren’t what they were in the time of Moby Dick. However, a recent analysis of 118 years of statistics revealed the vast majority of the decline occurred prior to the Common Fisheries Policy’s implementation in 1983. In fact, the policy is now overall helping, not harming, the country’s fisheries.

Since EU policy was reformed in 2002, the health of many fish stocks has improved. By 2011 the majority of assessed fisheries were considered to be sustainably fished. Take the case of North Sea cod: once the “poster child” for overfishing and all that was wrong with European policy, it is now recovering strongly and likely to be certified as sustainable next year.

The EU is now phasing out the discarding of unwanted fish and setting quotas more in line with scientific advice. The aim is to ensure maximum sustainable yield of all stocks by 2020.

Who actually owns “our” fish?

Ownership of UK fishing quotas is controversial and often misunderstood. After total EU fishing limits are decided by the Council of fisheries ministers, it is up to each member state to distribute its share among its own fleet.

This is not an EU decision. The fact that a single giant Dutch-owned vessel nets a quarter of the English quota (6% of the UK total) might be shocking, especially considering the UK’s quota is in theory shared between more than 6,000 vessels, but the UK government could easily change how it allocates fish. In fact, the alternative allocation systems suggested by some pro-Brexit groups are already in place elsewhere in Europe.

Your plaice or mine?

Another common argument for Brexit is that it would give the UK sole control of the fish in its waters. However, these fish are not “British”; they don’t respect national boundaries. Mackerel, herring, cod and other commercial species are all highly mobile, and move easily across borders, especially in places such as the North, Celtic and Irish Seas, where “exclusive economic zones” are jammed together like sardines in a can.

So unlike more isolated countries such as Iceland and Norway, the UK was always going to have to share its fish with its neighbours, especially as we moved into an era of global maritime regulation.

Fencing out foreign fishermen

A post-Brexit UK might still have to agree quotas with its neighbours, but could it prevent foreign boats from fishing in its waters? Maybe. But only with huge investment in monitoring and control public bodies such as the Marine Management Organisation (MMO) – organisations which are being cut at present.

Whether the UK would want this sort of escalation is a different question, as it would also mean British boats could no longer fish in the waters of other European nations. This is a major concern in the fishing industry as 20% of the fish caught by the UK fleet is landed elsewhere in the EU.

The reality is that a Brexit would require a complete re-negotiation of fishing rights, with uncertain outcomes. Some of these rights extend back to the Middle Ages and banning foreign vessels from UK waters may well be incompatible with international law.

Such negotiations may harm trading relationships with Europe. At present the UK exports around 80% of its wild-caught seafood, with four of the top five destinations being European countries.

Remaining in the EU also has big benefits for the marine ecosystems that the fishing industry ultimately relies on. The Habitats Directive protects key habitats and species such as reefs and Atlantic salmon, while the Water Framework Directive and Marine Strategy Framework Directive commit EU members to restore and protect the environment. It seems unlikely that the UK’s current Conservative government, at least, would continue similarly progressive measures after a Brexit.

It’s no surprise the “In” campaign is gaining support from a range of environmental groups – the weight of evidence is on their side. In contrast, many fishermen have strong feelings about the EU, but the main industry organisations and decision makers are remaining neutral.

We’ve come a long way since the bad old days of excessive quotas and widespread illegal fishing. As things become more sustainable, fish numbers are rebounding, leading to increasing UK fishing quotas and growing profits (now the highest in the EU).

The history of the EU’s fishing policy is one of criticism and improvement. It is therefore unclear why the UK would want to abandon ship at this point.

This piece was written by Dr Bryce Stewart, lecturer at the University of York and Griffin Carpenter, Economic Modeller at the New Economic Foundation. It originally published in The Conversation. 

 

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